Simons Institute Fellowships

The Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing at UC Berkeley invites applications for Research Fellowships for academic year 2014-15.

Simons-Berkeley Research Fellowships are an opportunity for outstanding junior scientists (up to 6 years from PhD by Fall 2014) to spend one or two semesters at the Institute in connection with one or more of its programs.  The programs for 2014-15 are as follows:

* Algorithmic Spectral Graph Theory (Fall 2014)
* Algorithms and Complexity in Algebraic Geometry (Fall 2014)
* Information Theory (Spring 2015)

Applicants who already hold junior faculty or postdoctoral positions are welcome to apply. In particular, applicants who hold, or expect to hold, postdoctoral appointments at other institutions are encouraged to apply to spend one semester as a Simons-Berkeley Fellow subject to the approval of the postdoctoral institution.

Further details and application instructions can be found at http://simons.berkeley.edu/fellows2014.  Information about the Institute and the above programs can be found at http://simons.berkeley.edu.

Deadline for applications: 15 December, 2013.

CCC Call for Visioning Proposals

[A CCC visioning workshop in 2008 led to the TCS vision nuggets hosted here.  It would be great to have another TCS-oriented visioning workshop, perhaps focused on a particular direction in the field.]

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From the CCC website:

The Computing Community Consortium (CCC) solicits proposals for workshops that will create exciting visions and agendas for research at the frontiers of computing.  Successful workshops will articulate new research visions, galvanize community interest in those visions, and mobilize support for those visions from the computing research community, government leaders, and funding agencies.  Past examples can be found at www.cra.org/ccc/visioning/visioning-activities.

Workshop organizers will be expected to bring together a group of scientists and practitioners in the area of interest, and to formulate a program that encourages new ideas, innovative thinking, and broad discussion. Workshops can be of varying sizes, typically ranging from 20 to 100 participants.  CCC will help to support both workshop organization and subsequent communication of the results.  The output of a successful workshop will be one or more white papers and reports for the CCC to post on its website. The CCC will work with the workshop organizers to communicate to other stakeholders and funding agencies.

Proposals are encouraged across the full spectrum of theoretical and applied work related to the creation and application of information technologies as well as their use in addressing important scientific or societal challenges.

Proposals with start dates prior to September 2014 should be submitted by 1 December 2013.

Simons Math+X Program

The Simons Foundation’s Math+X program is designed to encourage novel collaborations between mathematics and other fields in science or engineering by providing substantial operating funds to create new chairs at U.S. universities that join mathematics departments with chosen partner departments through matching grants for endowment.

Number of Awards: The foundation may award up to two Math+X grants per year.

Mathematics and X Departments: The X partner should be a department of science or engineering that will engage in significant collaboration with the mathematics department in an area where such collaboration is not the norm. Both departments must have doctoral programs.

X partners in finance and business will not be considered. Areas where there are already well-established links with mathematics, such as economics, string theory or computational complexity, will also not be considered unless the proposal involves particularly unusual collaborations.

Letter of Intent Deadline: September 30

NSF Graduate Research Fellowships

NSF Graduate Research Fellowships provide 3 years of funding for US citizens and permanent residents pursuing research-based master’s and doctoral degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines who are at accredited US institutions.    Students can apply as late as the fall term of their second year of graduate school.    The deadline for applications in computer science is November 4; applications in mathematical sciences are due November 5.

NSF appointment of Rao Kosaraju as CCF Division Director

See message below from Farnam Jahanian (head of CISE at NSF).  Thanks in advance to Rao Kosaraju for taking on this very important position, and to Susanne Hambrusch for all she has done as CCF Division Director!

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From: CISE Announcements [mailto:CISE-ANNOUNCE@LISTSERV.NSF.GOV] On Behalf Of Jahanian, Farnam
Sent: Thursday, August 29, 2013 4:27 PM
To: CISE-ANNOUNCE@LISTSERV.NSF.GOV
Subject: Appointment of Dr. Rao Kosaraju as CCF Division Director at NSF

Dear CISE Community,

I am delighted to announce the appointment of Professsor Rao Kosaraju to the position of Director of the CISE Division of Computing and Communication Foundations (CCF), effective January 2014.

Prof. Kosaraju will be joining the National Science Foundation (NSF) from the Johns Hopkins University (JHU), where he is currently the Edward J. Schaefer Professor of Computer Science. He has been on the JHU faculty since 1969, where he has served in the departments of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, including as Department Chair for Computer Science. Prof. Kosaraju has made significant contributions to the design and analysis of parallel and sequential algorithms. His current research interests span a wide range of topics, from efficient pattern-matching algorithms to computational biology and immune system theory. A prolific scholar, he is a widely recognized leader in the computer science community.  His research has been supported by NSF, the U.S. Army Research Office, and the National Bureau of Standards (now the National Institute of Standards and Technology).

Prof. Kosaraju holds a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, an M. Tech from the Indian Institute of Technology, and a B. Eng. from Andhra University. He is a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and has been an editor for a number of journals, including the SIAM Journal on Computing. He is known for his enthusiasm for service and excellence in computing education, for which he has received numerous awards. He has served on Advisory Committees and External Review Boards for a variety of universities. From 1985-1991, he served on NSF’s Advisory Committee for Computer and Computation Research (now the CISE Advisory Committee), which he chaired from 1989-1991. We are confidant that he will successfully represent the diverse spectrum of research areas covered in CCF and that he will significantly contribute to CISE’s mission in advancing the frontiers of computing, communications and information science and engineering.

I would also like to take this opportunity to thank Professor Susanne Hambrusch for her many contributions to CISE and the computing community. She served as DD from 2010 to 2013, leading CCF in its mission to support research and education projects that explore the foundations of computing and communications devices and their usage. In addition to her stewardship of the CCF core programs, Susanne successfully led the development of several crosscutting programs and initiatives at NSF including CyberSEES, the interdisciplinary Faculty Program in Quantum Information Science, eXploiting Parallelism and Scalability (XPS), and the US-Israel Collaboration in Computer Science. Furthermore, during her tenure at NSF, she worked tirelessly to increase the number of Graduate Research Fellowships for students pursuing CISE disciplines. She returns to Purdue University at the end of August 2013.  Susanne has been an invaluable member of the CISE leadership team. NSF greatly appreciates Susanne’s many contributions and her efforts on behalf of the CISE community.

On behalf of the CISE Directorate, I would like to thank the external search committee members (http://www.nsf.gov/cise/ccf/CCF_DD_SearchCommittee.pdf) for their excellent work in identifying an extraordinary pool of candidates for this important position. Their service was invaluable in helping NSF identify the right candidate for this job.

I enthusiastically welcome Prof. Kosaraju to the CISE Directorate, and look forward to working with him to advance the frontiers of knowledge in computing and communication foundations. Together, we will ensure that the CISE community continues to lead in the discovery and innovation required to meet our most pressing societal challenges.

Best regards,
Farnam

Farnam Jahanian
NSF Assistant Director for CISE
National Science Foundation

tel: (703) 292-8900
email: fjahania@nsf.gov
web: http://www.nsf.gov/cise/about.jsp

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Call for ACM Award Nominations

See below for upcoming deadlines for ACM Award Nominations.  As usual, the CATCS is available to help with the nomination process (in the form of providing advice, connecting you with others who might help, etc.); just contact a member of the committee.

Note that for ACM Fellow Nominations, the candidate must have been a Professional Member of ACM (not just SIGACT member) for at least 5 years continuously.  Similarly, becoming an IEEE Fellow requires 5 years of continuous IEEE membership (not just IEEE Computer Society Membership).

In addition to the awards below, note that there are also several SIGACT-specific awards.

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From: Rosemary McGuinness
Sent: Friday, August 16, 2013 3:51 PM
Subject: Call for Award Nominations

AWARD NOMINATIONS SOLICITED

As part of its mission, ACM brings broad recognition to outstanding technical and professional achievements in the computing and information technology community. Each year our award committees evaluate the contributions of candidates in a wide spectrum of professional and technological arenas.

We welcome nominations by ACM members of those who deserve recognition for their accomplishments. Please refer to the ACM Awards website at http://awards.acm.org for:

• award descriptions and information on former winners

• nomination procedures, members of the 2013 Award Committees, and contact information

Each award has its own nomination cycle. The following nominations are due this Fall.

Nominations due September 5:

Fellows:  ACM’s most prestigious member grade which recognizes the top 1% of members

Nominations due October 31:

ACM Doctoral Dissertation Award:   best doctoral dissertation in computer science and engineering

Nominations due November 30, 2013:

A.M. Turing Award:   major contributions of lasting importance to computing

ACM – Infosys Foundation Award:   personal contributions by young scientists and system developers

Distinguished Service Award:    service contributions to the computing community at large

Grace Murray Hopper Award:   outstanding young computer professional, based on a single recent major technical or service contribution

Paris Kanellakis Theory and Practice Award:   theoretical accomplishments that have had significant impact on practice

Karl V. Karlstrom Outstanding Educator Award:   advancing new teaching methodologies, curriculum development in computing, or significant contributions to ACM’s educational mission

Outstanding Contribution to ACM Award:   outstanding contributions to ACM, in both value and degree

ACM/AAAI Allen Newell Award:   career contributions with breadth or that bridge computer science and other disciplines

Software System Award:    developing a software system that has had a lasting influence

For SIG-specific Awards, please visit http://awards.acm.org.

Cherri Pancake (pancake@nacse.org), ACM Awards Committee Chair
Elisa Bertino (bertino@cerias.purdue.edu), SIG Governing Board Awards Committee Liaison
Rosemary McGuinness (mcguinness@acm.org), ACM Awards Committee Liaison

AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellowships

U.S. Citizens with PhDs in theoretical computer science (or other fields) who have an interest in policy and/or public service should consider applying for a AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellowship.  These provide opportunities to serve for up to 3 years working with Congress or a federal agency on science-related policymaking.  In particular, there are opportunities within the NSF Directorate for Computer and Information Sciences & Engineering (CISE).

Applications are due by November 1. 

We also encourage people from the TCS community to think about proposing a session on an exciting area of research at a future AAAS Meeting.  Such a session typically would involve 3-4 speakers giving talks aimed at a general audience, and are a great way to increase the public awareness and visibility of the field.  The sessions for the February 2014 meeting are already decided, but eventually there should be an open call for proposals for the 2015 meeting.

NSF Algorithmic Foundations and SaTC solicitations

NSF has released its 2013-14 solicitations for its Core Programs, including the “Algorithmic Foundations (AF)” program, which is the core program focused on theoretical computer science.  Contrary to possible historical reputations, the AF program has had quite reasonable grant sizes and funding rates in recent years, so do consider sending a proposal!  The relevant deadlines are:

- medium proposals ($500k-$1.2m): Oct 15
- large proposals ($1.2m-$3m): Nov 19
- small proposals ($0-$500k): Jan 17.

Note that the small deadline is now in January, rather than December.

The same deadlines also apply for the Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace (SaTC) program, which funds a lot of TCS work in cryptography, security, and privacy.   Instead of a “large” category, the SaTC program has “frontier” proposals, which can be as large as $10m.  And it also accepts proposals in “cybersecurity education,” with a deadline of Dec 19.

FOCS 2013 workshops

Continuing the tradition of recent FOCS/STOC conferences, FOCS 2013 will have a workshop-and-tutorials day on Saturday, October 26, immediately preceding the main conferences. Chris Umans and I are the workshop chairs. We invite researchers to submit workshop or tutorial proposals. This is an opportunity to expose the FOCS audience to your favorite topic. The proposal is relatively light-weight – no more than 2 pages – so Chris and I encourage you to start thinking of ideas for great workshops/tutorials at FOCS.  The proposal submission deadline is August 15. See the details here: FOCS-2013-workshops-call

Additionally, if you have thoughts on topics for workshops/tutorials you would like to see at FOCS, but do not consider yourself an organizer, feel free to send them to Chris and me. We’ll do our best to find organizers.

Simons Institute Symposium on Visions for the Theory of Computing

The Simons Institute held an inspiring Symposium on Visions for the Theory of Computing at the end of May.  You can read a summary of the talks by Christos Papadimitriou and watch videos of the presentations.

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