CCC Call for Visioning Proposals

[A CCC visioning workshop in 2008 led to the TCS vision nuggets hosted here.  It would be great to have another TCS-oriented visioning workshop, perhaps focused on a particular direction in the field.]

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From the CCC website:

The Computing Community Consortium (CCC) solicits proposals for workshops that will create exciting visions and agendas for research at the frontiers of computing.  Successful workshops will articulate new research visions, galvanize community interest in those visions, and mobilize support for those visions from the computing research community, government leaders, and funding agencies.  Past examples can be found at www.cra.org/ccc/visioning/visioning-activities.

Workshop organizers will be expected to bring together a group of scientists and practitioners in the area of interest, and to formulate a program that encourages new ideas, innovative thinking, and broad discussion. Workshops can be of varying sizes, typically ranging from 20 to 100 participants.  CCC will help to support both workshop organization and subsequent communication of the results.  The output of a successful workshop will be one or more white papers and reports for the CCC to post on its website. The CCC will work with the workshop organizers to communicate to other stakeholders and funding agencies.

Proposals are encouraged across the full spectrum of theoretical and applied work related to the creation and application of information technologies as well as their use in addressing important scientific or societal challenges.

Proposals with start dates prior to September 2014 should be submitted by 1 December 2013.

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Simons Math+X Program

The Simons Foundation’s Math+X program is designed to encourage novel collaborations between mathematics and other fields in science or engineering by providing substantial operating funds to create new chairs at U.S. universities that join mathematics departments with chosen partner departments through matching grants for endowment.

Number of Awards: The foundation may award up to two Math+X grants per year.

Mathematics and X Departments: The X partner should be a department of science or engineering that will engage in significant collaboration with the mathematics department in an area where such collaboration is not the norm. Both departments must have doctoral programs.

X partners in finance and business will not be considered. Areas where there are already well-established links with mathematics, such as economics, string theory or computational complexity, will also not be considered unless the proposal involves particularly unusual collaborations.

Letter of Intent Deadline: September 30

NSF Graduate Research Fellowships

NSF Graduate Research Fellowships provide 3 years of funding for US citizens and permanent residents pursuing research-based master’s and doctoral degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines who are at accredited US institutions.    Students can apply as late as the fall term of their second year of graduate school.    The deadline for applications in computer science is November 4; applications in mathematical sciences are due November 5.

NSF appointment of Rao Kosaraju as CCF Division Director

See message below from Farnam Jahanian (head of CISE at NSF).  Thanks in advance to Rao Kosaraju for taking on this very important position, and to Susanne Hambrusch for all she has done as CCF Division Director!

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From: CISE Announcements [mailto:CISE-ANNOUNCE@LISTSERV.NSF.GOV] On Behalf Of Jahanian, Farnam
Sent: Thursday, August 29, 2013 4:27 PM
To: CISE-ANNOUNCE@LISTSERV.NSF.GOV
Subject: Appointment of Dr. Rao Kosaraju as CCF Division Director at NSF

Dear CISE Community,

I am delighted to announce the appointment of Professsor Rao Kosaraju to the position of Director of the CISE Division of Computing and Communication Foundations (CCF), effective January 2014.

Prof. Kosaraju will be joining the National Science Foundation (NSF) from the Johns Hopkins University (JHU), where he is currently the Edward J. Schaefer Professor of Computer Science. He has been on the JHU faculty since 1969, where he has served in the departments of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, including as Department Chair for Computer Science. Prof. Kosaraju has made significant contributions to the design and analysis of parallel and sequential algorithms. His current research interests span a wide range of topics, from efficient pattern-matching algorithms to computational biology and immune system theory. A prolific scholar, he is a widely recognized leader in the computer science community.  His research has been supported by NSF, the U.S. Army Research Office, and the National Bureau of Standards (now the National Institute of Standards and Technology).

Prof. Kosaraju holds a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, an M. Tech from the Indian Institute of Technology, and a B. Eng. from Andhra University. He is a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and has been an editor for a number of journals, including the SIAM Journal on Computing. He is known for his enthusiasm for service and excellence in computing education, for which he has received numerous awards. He has served on Advisory Committees and External Review Boards for a variety of universities. From 1985-1991, he served on NSF’s Advisory Committee for Computer and Computation Research (now the CISE Advisory Committee), which he chaired from 1989-1991. We are confidant that he will successfully represent the diverse spectrum of research areas covered in CCF and that he will significantly contribute to CISE’s mission in advancing the frontiers of computing, communications and information science and engineering.

I would also like to take this opportunity to thank Professor Susanne Hambrusch for her many contributions to CISE and the computing community. She served as DD from 2010 to 2013, leading CCF in its mission to support research and education projects that explore the foundations of computing and communications devices and their usage. In addition to her stewardship of the CCF core programs, Susanne successfully led the development of several crosscutting programs and initiatives at NSF including CyberSEES, the interdisciplinary Faculty Program in Quantum Information Science, eXploiting Parallelism and Scalability (XPS), and the US-Israel Collaboration in Computer Science. Furthermore, during her tenure at NSF, she worked tirelessly to increase the number of Graduate Research Fellowships for students pursuing CISE disciplines. She returns to Purdue University at the end of August 2013.  Susanne has been an invaluable member of the CISE leadership team. NSF greatly appreciates Susanne’s many contributions and her efforts on behalf of the CISE community.

On behalf of the CISE Directorate, I would like to thank the external search committee members (http://www.nsf.gov/cise/ccf/CCF_DD_SearchCommittee.pdf) for their excellent work in identifying an extraordinary pool of candidates for this important position. Their service was invaluable in helping NSF identify the right candidate for this job.

I enthusiastically welcome Prof. Kosaraju to the CISE Directorate, and look forward to working with him to advance the frontiers of knowledge in computing and communication foundations. Together, we will ensure that the CISE community continues to lead in the discovery and innovation required to meet our most pressing societal challenges.

Best regards,
Farnam

Farnam Jahanian
NSF Assistant Director for CISE
National Science Foundation

tel: (703) 292-8900
email: fjahania@nsf.gov
web: http://www.nsf.gov/cise/about.jsp

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