Edit-a-thon update

This event was a great success! Thank you to all of the participants for contributing your time. Please keep up the momentum and continue to edit the pages you made a start on. Please continue to record your progress on the list of topics. Special thanks to Aviad Rubinstein and Yuval Filmus for offering expert advice at the event.

We plan to organize this event again at future STOCs, and hope many more people can participate. Even an hour of your time can have a huge impact on the community!

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Wikipedia edit-a-thon at STOC’19

CATCS is organizing a Wikipedia edit-a-thon at STOC in Phoenix this year. The goal is to create/edit Wikipedia articles on TCS topics that need improvement. (A crowdsourced list of such topics is maintained here.) The event will be held on June 24th, 2019 in West 104A, starting right after the STOC business meeting around 9-9:30 pm.

We invite members of the community to participate. Prior experience with Wikipedia is a plus, but is not necessary. If you are interested in participating, please fill out this form. Participants are asked to bring their own laptop or other device. Power outlets will be available. Light refreshments will be provided.

If you are interested in helping improve TCS coverage on Wikipedia but are unable to attend this event, please see this post for how you can help.

 

CATCS mailing list and sign-up link

CATCS is starting up a new mailing list to send out annual newsletters. Messages will be sent out 1-2 times every year describing recent projects undertaken by the committee, funding opportunities, links to useful resources, etc. Anyone interested in hearing about our activities is welcome to sign up at this link. You do not have to be a member of SIGACT to sign up.

2nd NAS Held Prize

A reminder about a fairly new major prize that is highly relevant to the TCS community (won last year by Prasad Raghavendra and David Steurer):

The National Academy of Sciences has initiated the Michael and Sheila Held Prize. The prize of $100,000 will be presented annually.  The Prize honors outstanding, innovative, creative and influential research in the areas of combinatorial and discrete optimization, or related parts of computer science,  such as the design and analysis of algorithms and complexity theory. The prize is intended to recognize recent work(defined as published within the last eight years). The prize was established in 2017 by the bequest of Michael and Sheila Held.

Nominations are due on October 1, 2018, and information about the submission process can be found at http://www.nasonline.org/held.

PS:  You can find information about many other awards related to TCS at the CATCS awards list.

CATCS Slides from STOC ’18

Here are the slides from Shuchi Chawla’s CATCS presentation at the STOC ’18 business meeting.  Shuchi will be the new CATCS chair, starting September 1.

New TCS Awards List

David Woodruff compiled a list of major awards that are relevant to the theoretical computer science community.  Included is a brief description of each, a link to the nomination instructions, and examples of researchers from TCS and related fields that won the award in the past.  See https://thmatters.wordpress.com/tcs-awards-list/.  (Also available under the “Resources” tab at TheoryMatters.)  Nominate a deserving theorist!

Graduating Bits/New TCS Book

  1. One great tradition at the ITCS conference is the “graduating bits” session, where graduating PhD students and postdocs give brief overviews of their research in advance of going out on the job market.  See here for instructions on how to apply (the deadline is January 8, 2018, and the session is four days later).  Hopefully these talks will be recorded and archived as well.
  2. Avi Wigderson has a new book coming out, Mathematics and Computation, with a draft freely available on the Web.  In addition to being a great overview of many of the “greatest hits” of theoretical computer science, the last chapter (Chapter 20) lays out how TCS has influenced and connected to the life sciences, the social sciences, and technology.

Opening for NSF CCF Division Director

Rao Kosaraju will be stepping down soon from his position as Director of the Division of Computing and Communication Foundations at NSF, after several years of terrific service.  The official job announcement for a new director was just posted.  This is an extremely important position — please consider applying!

NSF Program Director opening in Algorithmic Foundations

In the US, most of the funding for TCS comes from the NSF.  It’s crucial for our community that good people serve at the NSF.  There’s a new opportunity to do so, with an opening for a new Program Director in the Algorithmic Foundations (AF) area: see job announcement here.  This is for a rotator position, which is generally two years in duration.  Please consider applying!

NAS Held Prize

Here are the details on a brand-new prize that is highly relevant to the TCS community:

The National Academy of Sciences has initiated the Michael and Sheila Held Prize. The prize of $100,000 will be presented annually.  The Prize honors outstanding, innovative, creative and influential research in the areas of combinatorial and discrete optimization, or related parts of computer science,  such as the design and analysis of algorithms and complexity theory. The prize is intended to recognize recent work(defined as published within the last eight years). The prize was established in 2017 by the bequest of Michael and Sheila Held.

The selection committee consists of Richard Karp, Kurt Mehlhorn, Christos Papadimitriou, Eva Tardos, and Avi Wigderson. Nominations are due on October 2, 2017, and information about the submission process can be found at http://www.nasonline.org/held.